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Da Vinci's Demons: Season Two by Bear McCreary (Review)

posted Jun 25, 2014, 1:01 PM by Kaya Savas

Bear McCreary has always been one of the most unique voices in television scoring. His work is always identifiable by his signature style, and his ability to craft sonic worlds to bring the story to life has always been a draw. I found his work on Da Vinci’s Demons Season 1 to be some of his most refined and mature work as a composer. It never went too far overboard with the stylistic approach and was able to craft a superb and thrilling narrative. The canvas which McCreary has here is large and vivid, and he takes every opportunity to take his score to new places. Season 2 continues everything that was brilliant about his season 1 score and keeps moving forward.

The album opens on a huge 11-minute track that propels us back into the world of Da Vinci. In fact, on this album you will find 4 tracks that break the 10-minute mark with a total album running time that is nearly 2-hours. This album, like the last one, is perfectly compiled to represent the musical arcs of the show. The music is filled with action, thrills, suspense, character moments and an awe-inspiring beauty. The instrumentation is fantastic, and the flow of the score is superb. This score’s dramatic flow with all its ups and downs, and lefts and rights is some of McCreary’s most exciting writing. The whole musical feel is wrapped up in a sense of romanticism filled with adventure and discovery. The extremely thematic and melodic nature of the entire score makes it prime for re-listenability. It has a brimming energy but a sweeping elegance to it all at once. The lengthy tracks show just how well the score works as the whole cohesive work. Da Vinci’s Demons continues to be one of McCreary’s most accomplished works and it will be exciting to see where he takes it.

Da Vinci’s Demons is such a fascinating narrative for a score, and McCreary made use of the opportunity and brought it all to the table. The score has a unique identity within the world of the show by complementing the plot perfectly. Bear’s unique voice as a composer is heard throughout every second, but it’s not too overly stylistic. The adventure, excitement and romanticism is all here and it makes for a great journey. McCreary’s Da Vinci’s Demons didn’t slow down one bit over the course of a new season, and still remains one of his finest works.