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Atlas Shrugged III: Who Is John Galt? by Elia Cmiral (Review)

posted Sep 26, 2014, 1:10 PM by Leo Mayr


Who Is John Galt? could as well be my first thought about Elia Cmiral‘s score to Atlas Shrugged III. Somehow this is one of these franchises that completely sneaked past me, but the reviews to the movie seem to explain why. The movie might be bad, it might be good, but the score is a completely different matter.

Cmiral does a great job creating the atmospheres for a sci-fi drama without an overly excessive use of synthesizers that is too common these days, but instead chooses an orchestral approach that actually surprised me. The album starts off with “The Strike“, a stunning 4-minute track that reminds me a lot of the opening track from Anthony Gonzalez and Joseph Trapanese‘s Oblivion which changes into a really nice theme. The album then drops its pace with some peaceful tracks that mix the predominant strings with occasional piano segments. Things are starting to get more suspenseful in “Stadler‘s Choice“ until it‘s getting really exciting midways in “Moving The Trains“, one of my favorites. From there things are getting calmer again. However, suspenseful and dramatic moments are appearing more frequently in the second half of the album. “No Amount Of Force“ increases the pace for a short while until the score reaches its climax with “Project F“ though by no means is it an action showdown. The final track then returns to something similar to the opening track but adds some drums and a fanfare like section usually heard at the end of a superhero movie. The score manages to create dramatic and emotional themes that feel just right and has some definite highlights worth experiencing.

Elia Cmiral does a great job creating an orchestral sci-fi drama that is worth returning to for more than one listen. However, I would not consider it one of the highlights of the year. Although most of the tracks are very similar in style and pace, it does not feel repetitive or dull. The music can easily compete with recent big budget scores, and makes me wonder why I have never heard from Elia Cmiral before while also making me look forward to whatever music he will compose next.